Why should ecosystem services be used for poverty alleviation? Establishing the ethical foundations of ESPA

Lead PI
Dr Janet Fisher
Institution
University of Edinburgh
Start Date
1 February, 2015
End Date
19 February, 2017
Project Code
NE/M007103/1

Background:

This research aims to find the answer to a fundamental question: why should ecosystem services (ES) be used for poverty alleviation?

ES do not automatically benefit poor people, but have been demonstrated to accrue to better-off and more powerful actors (Ronnback et al., 2007; Daw et al., 2011), and although many environmental interventions continue to take place in settings characterised by entrenched poverty, its the demand and pressure from the non-poor on ES is predicted to rise in coming decades (Meyfroidt et al., 2013). It is a particularly timely question for the conservation community, because of active debates about the 'new conservation' and the ethical principles underpinning conservation practice (Lalasz et al., 2011; Soule, 2013).

This project has the potential to provide a step-change in how poverty and the governance of ES are conceptualised, and in turn, how related trade-offs (human wellbeing vs. non-human nature; current vs. future generations; the poor vs. the greater good of all humans) may be resolved.

 

Authors Title Year Citations
Holmes, G.;Sandbrook, C.;Fisher, J.A. Understanding conservationists' perspectives on the new-conservation debate 2017 1
Name Role Organisation Country
Dr Janet Fisher Bolivia; China; Global; Nepal; Uganda
Dr Janet Fisher Lead Principal Investigator University of Edinburgh United Kingdom
Dr Adrian Martin Co Investigator University of East Anglia United Kingdom
Dr Helen Marie Schneider Co Investigator Fauna and Flora International United Kingdom
Professor Thomas Sikor Co Investigator University of East Anglia United Kingdom
Dr Ruth A Makoff Researcher Co Investigator University of East Anglia United Kingdom